Critically Acclaimed Exhibition opens at CMA April 19

The Radical Camera: New York's Photo League, 1936 - 1951

Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League.   c Estate of Jerome Liebling.
Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Estate of Jerome Liebling.
  • Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League.   c Estate of Jerome Liebling.
    Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Estate of Jerome Liebling.
    Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League.   c Estate of Jerome Liebling.
    Jerome Liebling, Butterfly Boy, New York, 1949, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Estate of Jerome Liebling.
  • Ida Wyman, Sidewalk Clock, New York, 1947, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase, Derby Fund.  c Ida Wyman.
    Ida Wyman, Sidewalk Clock, New York, 1947, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase, Derby Fund. c Ida Wyman.
    Ida Wyman, Sidewalk Clock, New York, 1947, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase, Derby Fund.  c Ida Wyman.
    Ida Wyman, Sidewalk Clock, New York, 1947, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase, Derby Fund. c Ida Wyman.
  • Sid Grossman, Coney Island, c. 1947, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Howard Greenberg Gallery.
    Sid Grossman, Coney Island, c. 1947, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Howard Greenberg Gallery.
    Sid Grossman, Coney Island, c. 1947, gelatin silver print.  Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Howard Greenberg Gallery.
    Sid Grossman, Coney Island, c. 1947, gelatin silver print. Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, Photo League Collection, Museum Purchase with funds provided by Elizabeth M. Ross, the Derby fund, John S. and Catherine Chapin Kobacker, and the Friends of the Photo League. c Howard Greenberg Gallery.

 

 

For Immediate Release:
February 15, 2012

Media Contact:
Nancy Colvin, 614.629.0303
                        nancy.colvin@cmaohio.org

Critically Acclaimed Exhibition opens at CMA April 19
The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936 – 1951

(Columbus, OH)– Drawing on the depth of two great Photo League museum collections, the Columbus Museum of Art and The Jewish Museum in New York City collaborated on an exhibition of nearly 150 vintage photographs.  The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936 – 1951, a formidable survey of the group’s history, its artistic significance, and its cultural, social and political milieu, will be on view at CMA April 19 – September 9, 2012.

Catherine Evans, exhibition co-curator and the William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography at the Columbus Museum of Art, observed that “This museum partnership is an extraordinary opportunity to showcase two in-depth collections. Because the images continue to have relevance today, it is especially important that the exhibition will be seen in four U.S. cities, reaching as broad an audience as possible.”

The exhibition premiered at The Jewish Museum on November 4, 2011, to rave reviews and remains on view there through March 25, 2012. The New York Times called The Radical Camera a “stirring show,” and the New York Photo Review hailed it as “nothing short of splendid.” The New Yorker named the exhibition one of the top ten photography shows of 2011.

Following its CMA presentation, The Radical Camera exhibition will travel to the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, CA (November 15, 2012 – February 24, 2013); and Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL (March 16 – June 16, 2013).

 Artists in the Photo League were known for capturing sharply revealing, compelling moments from everyday life.  Their focus centered on New York City and its vibrant streets – a shoeshine boy, a brass band on a bustling corner, a crowded beach at Coney Island.  Many of the images are beautiful, yet harbor strong social commentary on issues of class, race, and opportunity.  The Radical Camera exhibition explores the fascinating blend of aesthetics and social activism at the heart of the Photo League.

The innovative contributions of the Photo League during its 15-year existence (1936–1951) were significant. As it grew, the League would mirror monumental shifts in the world starting with the Depression, through World War II and ending with the Red Scare. Born of the worker’s movement, the Photo League was an organization of young, idealistic photographers who believed in documentary photography as an expressive medium and powerful tool for exposing social problems. It was also a school with teachers such as Sid Grossman, who encouraged students to take their cameras to the streets and discover the meaning of their work as well as their relationship to it.  The League had a darkroom for printing, published an acclaimed newsletter called Photo Notes, offered exhibition space, and was a place to socialize, especially among first-generation Jewish-Americans.

The first museum exhibition in three decades to comprehensively look at the Photo League, The Radical Camera reveals that the League encouraged a surprisingly broad spectrum of work throughout extraordinarily turbulent times.  The organization’s members included some of the most noted photographers of the mid-20th century—W. Eugene Smith, Weegee, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott and Aaron Siskind, to name a few.  The Photo League helped validate photography as a fine art, presenting student work and guest exhibitions by established photographers such as EugèneAtget, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Edward Weston, among others.

These affecting black and white photographs show life as it was lived mostly on the streets, sidewalks and subways of New York. Joy, playfulness, and caprice as well as poverty and hardship are in evidence.  In addition to their urban focus, Leaguers photographed in rural America, and during World War II, in Latin America and Europe.  The exhibition also addresses the active participation of women who found rare access and recognition at the League. The Radical Camera presents the League within a critical, historical context. Developments in photojournalism were catalyzing a new information era in which photo essays were appearing for the first time in magazines such as Life and Look.

As time went on, its social documentary roots evolved toward a more experimental approach, laying the foundation for the next generation of street photographers. One of the principal themes of the exhibition is how the League fostered a multifaceted and changing identity of documentary photography. “A mixture of passion and disillusionment characterizes the Photo League’s growth, which led photographers away from objective documentary images and toward more subjective, poetic readings of life,” said Mason Klein, exhibition co-curator and a curator at The Jewish Museum. “The tenets of truth in documentary photography laid down by League members were also challenged by them and ultimately upended by members of the New York School,” he added. 

In 1947, the League came under the pall of McCarthyism and was blacklisted for its alleged involvement with the Communist Party.  Ironically, the Photo League had just begun a national campaign to broaden its base as a “Center for American Photography.”  Despite the support of Ansel Adams, Beaumont and Nancy Newhall, Paul Strand and many other national figures, this vision of a national photography center could not overcome the Red Scare. As paranoia and fear spread, the Photo League was forced to disband in 1951.

The exhibition was organized by Catherine Evans, William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography, Columbus Museum of Art and Mason Klein, Curator of Fine Arts, The Jewish Museum.

Exhibition Catalogue 

 In conjunction with the exhibition The Jewish Museum, Columbus Museum of Art, and Yale University Press co-published The Radical Camera: New York’s Photo League, 1936 – 1951 by Mason Klein and Catherine Evans with contributions by Maurice Berger, Michael Levy, and Anne Wilkes Tucker.  Time magazine extolled the catalogue as a “heavyweight contender” and a “terrific book.” Art in America celebrated the title as one of the top ten art books of 2011, and the New England Book Festival named The Radical Camera its photography art winner. The book, available worldwide, is in the CMA Museum Store.

Sponsorship

The Radical Camera: New York's Photo League, 1936-1951 has been organized by the Columbus Museum of Art and The Jewish Museum, New York.  Major support was provided by the Phillip and Edith Leonian Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Limited Brands Foundation.

About the Columbus Museum of Art

The Columbus Museum of Art, founded in 1878, is committed to its mission of creating great experiences with art for everyone. Since its earliest history, the Museum’s collection has been celebrated as a treasure trove of European and American Modernism. The collection includes important examples of Impressionism, German Expressionism, and Cubism. A growing interest in folk art, contemporary art, and photography continues the Museum’s commitment to collecting and exhibiting art of our time. The Museum also presents a rich menu of traveling and CMA-organized special exhibitions, which have garnered critical and popular acclaim. CMA recently renovated its historic Elizabeth M. and Richard M. Ross building and inaugurated its Center for Creativity with a new focus on visitor-centered experiences. The Museum supports its community by fostering imagination, innovation, and critical thinking skills for the 21st century.

The Columbus Museum of Art is located at 480 East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. The Greater Columbus Arts Council, Nationwide Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, and the Charlotte R. Haller, Lewis K. Osborne, and Robert B. Hurst funds of The Columbus Foundation provide ongoing support. CMA and the Museum Store are open Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 am to 5:30 pm, and until 8:30 pm every Thursday. The Palette Express is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm.  Museum admission is $10 for adults; $8 for seniors and students 6 and older; and free for members, children 5 and younger. Admission is free every Sunday. For additional information, call 614.221.4848 or visit www.columbusmuseum.org

About The Jewish Museum

Widely admired for its exhibitions and collections that inspire people of all backgrounds, The Jewish Museum is one of the world’s preeminent institutions devoted to exploring the intersection of art and Jewish culture from ancient to modern times.  The Jewish Museum was established in 1904, when Judge Mayer Sulzberger donated 26 ceremonial art objects to The Jewish Theological Seminary of America as the core of a museum collection. Today, the Museum maintains a collection of 26,000 objects – paintings, sculpture, works on paper, photographs, archaeological artifacts, ceremonial objects, and broadcast media.  The Jewish Museum organizes a diverse schedule of internationally acclaimed and award-winning temporary exhibitions as well as broad-based programs for families, adults, and school groups. 

The Jewish Museum is located at 1109 Fifth Avenue at 92nd Street, New York City. Museum hours are Saturday, Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, 11am to 5:45pm; Thursday, 11am to 8pm; and Friday, 11am to 4pm.  Museum admission is $12.00 for adults, $10.00 for senior citizens, $7.50 for students, free for children under 12 and Jewish Museum members.  Admission is free on Saturdays.  For information on The Jewish Museum, call 212.423.3200 or visit the website at http://www.thejewishmuseum.org.

 

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