BOSTONGLOBE.COM INTRODUCES NEW FEATURE "FROM THE ARCHIVES"

Showcasing Treasures from the Globe's 140-year-old Archives

CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

April 29, 1910: The Boston Common is known for its gorgeous plantings and views of the stately buildings on Beacon Hill. Hyacinths, tulips, and other plants that were grown in the city's greenhouses, then located on East Cottage St. in Dorchester, got their first showing for spring. The architecture and beautiful landscaping is much the same today.
CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive April 29, 1910: The Boston Common is known for its gorgeous plantings and views of the stately buildings on Beacon Hill. Hyacinths, tulips, and other plants that were grown in the city's greenhouses, then located on East Cottage St. in Dorchester, got their first showing for spring. The architecture and beautiful landscaping is much the same today.
  • CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

April 29, 1910: The Boston Common is known for its gorgeous plantings and views of the stately buildings on Beacon Hill. Hyacinths, tulips, and other plants that were grown in the city's greenhouses, then located on East Cottage St. in Dorchester, got their first showing for spring. The architecture and beautiful landscaping is much the same today.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive April 29, 1910: The Boston Common is known for its gorgeous plantings and views of the stately buildings on Beacon Hill. Hyacinths, tulips, and other plants that were grown in the city's greenhouses, then located on East Cottage St. in Dorchester, got their first showing for spring. The architecture and beautiful landscaping is much the same today.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

April 29, 1910: The Boston Common is known for its gorgeous plantings and views of the stately buildings on Beacon Hill. Hyacinths, tulips, and other plants that were grown in the city's greenhouses, then located on East Cottage St. in Dorchester, got their first showing for spring. The architecture and beautiful landscaping is much the same today.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive April 29, 1910: The Boston Common is known for its gorgeous plantings and views of the stately buildings on Beacon Hill. Hyacinths, tulips, and other plants that were grown in the city's greenhouses, then located on East Cottage St. in Dorchester, got their first showing for spring. The architecture and beautiful landscaping is much the same today.
  • CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

May 22, 1930: As thousands of spectators watched from the slope of the athletic field on the Common, 61 Boston public school bands totaling more than 3,000 students participated in Boston's Tercentenary festival. The only competition of the festival was between four sixth-grade bands, with the Julia Ward Howe School District of Roxbury declared the winner.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive May 22, 1930: As thousands of spectators watched from the slope of the athletic field on the Common, 61 Boston public school bands totaling more than 3,000 students participated in Boston's Tercentenary festival. The only competition of the festival was between four sixth-grade bands, with the Julia Ward Howe School District of Roxbury declared the winner.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

May 22, 1930: As thousands of spectators watched from the slope of the athletic field on the Common, 61 Boston public school bands totaling more than 3,000 students participated in Boston's Tercentenary festival. The only competition of the festival was between four sixth-grade bands, with the Julia Ward Howe School District of Roxbury declared the winner.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive May 22, 1930: As thousands of spectators watched from the slope of the athletic field on the Common, 61 Boston public school bands totaling more than 3,000 students participated in Boston's Tercentenary festival. The only competition of the festival was between four sixth-grade bands, with the Julia Ward Howe School District of Roxbury declared the winner.
  • CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

Boston Globe library staff were researching, filing clips, indexing the newspaper and sorting photos on May 7, 1941.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive Boston Globe library staff were researching, filing clips, indexing the newspaper and sorting photos on May 7, 1941.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

Boston Globe library staff were researching, filing clips, indexing the newspaper and sorting photos on May 7, 1941.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive Boston Globe library staff were researching, filing clips, indexing the newspaper and sorting photos on May 7, 1941.
  • CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

The Boston Globe launched its first edition 140 years ago, on Monday, March 4, 1872. Originally called "The Boston Daily Globe," it ran eight pages and featured no photos.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive The Boston Globe launched its first edition 140 years ago, on Monday, March 4, 1872. Originally called "The Boston Daily Globe," it ran eight pages and featured no photos.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive

The Boston Globe launched its first edition 140 years ago, on Monday, March 4, 1872. Originally called "The Boston Daily Globe," it ran eight pages and featured no photos.
    CREDIT: Boston Globe Archive The Boston Globe launched its first edition 140 years ago, on Monday, March 4, 1872. Originally called "The Boston Daily Globe," it ran eight pages and featured no photos.

Boston, April 9, 2012 – The Boston Globe today launched “From the Archives” on BostonGlobe.com, a new online collection of historic Globe photographs from 1872 to the present. The feature is available to digital and print subscribers at www.bostonglobe.com/specials/insiders/fromthearchives.

 

“From the Archives” will highlight three to five new photos every Thursday, often based on a specific theme or event, such as this week’s theme, the Boston Common. Globe photo editors will compile the galleries from more than a million staff photographs, many of which are being digitized for the first time.

 

“For 140 years, the Globe has been publishing stories and photographs chronicling life in Boston,” said Bennie DiNardo, Boston Globe deputy managing editor of multimedia. “For the first 100 years of its existence – through two world wars, the sale of Babe Ruth to the Yankees in 1919, the Brinks Robbery of 1950, and hundreds of other historical events – those documents were clipped, annotated, and archived by Globe librarians. The library holds a trove of incredible images, some never before published, that reveal a Boston that is rarely seen.”

 

An inside look at the Globe’s beginnings is also chronicled on the site, illustrated in photos, from the original office of “The Boston Daily Globe” to the groundbreaking for the newspaper’s current Dorchester headquarters. In addition the feature will showcase special editorial content, including articles, for example, about John F. Kennedy from the 1960s.

 

“From the Archives” is another exclusive benefit for Boston Globe subscribers. All print and/or digital subscribers have access to BostonGlobe.com, the new Globe ePaper, Globe e-books, Globe Insiders exclusive events and offers, and now “From the Archives.”